Tag Archive | Librarianship

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Why Does My Library Use Social Media?

http://chronicle.com/blognetwork/theubiquitouslibrarian/2011/07/06/why-does-my-library-use-social-media/

When you ask most librarians why they have a social media presence they will likely say things like:

  • To promote library services, workshops, and events.
  • To provide better access to information.
  • To be where the users are.
  • To enhance instruction.
  • To collect feedback from patrons.

These are all fine actions— but they are what we are doing, not whywe are doing it.

Choose Privacy Week 2014: Just Another Hysterical Librarian for Freedom

http://www.oif.ala.org/oif/?p=4968

Are librarians hysterical about protecting user privacy, as Attorney General John Ashcroft contended in 2003? That was the question asked when LIS students at Rutgers University heard from two librarians on the front lines defending and promoting intellectual freedom since the September 11th terrorist attacks in 2001. The colloquium entitled Libraries, Privacy, and National Securityfeatured George Christian, the plaintiff in John Doe v. Gonzales who was served a National Security Letter (NSL) in 2005 that demanded patron records from the Library Connection in Connecticut, and Patrice McDermott, Executive Director of the coalition OpenTheGovernment.org, an organization that shines a light on surveillance transparency.

Radical Librarianship: How Ninja Librarians are Ensuring Patrons’ Electronic Privacy

http://boingboing.net/2014/09/13/radical-librarianship-how-nin.html

Librarians in Massachusetts are working to give their patrons a chance to opt-out of pervasive surveillance. Partnering with the ACLU of Massachusetts, area librarians have been teaching and taking workshops on how freedom of speech and the right to privacy are compromised by the surveillance of online and digital communications — and what new privacy-protecting services they can offer patrons to shield them from unwanted spying of their library activity.

Librarians Won’t Stay Quiet about Government Surveillance

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-switch/wp/2014/10/03/librarians-wont-stay-quiet-about-government-surveillance/

In September 2003, Attorney General John Ashcroft called out the librarians. The American Library Association and civil liberties groups, he said, were pushing “baseless hysteria” about the controversial Patriot Act. He suggested that they were worried that spy agencies wanted to know “how far you have gotten on the latest Tom Clancy novel.”

Ashcroft was 17 speeches into a national speaking tour defending the Patriot Act, a law expanding government surveillance powers that passed nearly unanimously in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. And all along the way, the librarians showed up to protest.

In the case of government surveillance, they are not shushing. They’ve been among the loudest voices urging freedom of information and privacy protections.

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Behavior Data vs. Patron Privacy: Productive Discomfort

http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2014/04/opinion/peer-to-peer-review/behavior-data-vs-patron-privacy-productive-discomfort-peer-to-peer-review/

I bring this up because of a strong tension I noticed at the recent Library Technology Conferencebetween library notions of privacy and academic libraries’ salutary desire to use various forms of patron behavior data to improve websites and other services. How much are we willing to snoop to get better at what we do? How do we gauge potential (not actual, let us pray) harm to patrons? When we do decide that snooping is worth the risks, how do we protect our patrons from data breaches (making the news at too many higher education institutions of late) and reidentification attacks? How do we avoid participating in today’s sinister commercial and political nightmare of greedy, thoughtless, not-always-disclosed physical and digital surveillance? Does performing surveillance in our much-trusted libraries not legitimize the other surveillance regimes?

Adobe is Spying on Users, Collecting Data on Their eBook Libraries

http://the-digital-reader.com/2014/10/06/adobe-spying-users-collecting-data-ebook-libraries/

My source told me, and I can confirm, that Adobe is tracking users in the app and uploading the data to their servers.

And just to be clear, I have seen this happen, and I can also tell you that Benjamin Daniel Mussler, the security researcher who found the security hole on Amazon.com, has also tested this at my request and saw it with his own eyes.

Adobe Responds to Reports of Their Spying, Offers Half Truths and Misleading Statements

http://the-digital-reader.com/2014/10/07/adobe-responds-reports-spying-half-truths-misleading-statements/

They may be a day late and a dollar short, but Adobe has finally responded to yesterday’s news that they were using the Digital Editions 4 app to spy on users.

Adobe hasn’t addressed all of the evidence against them, but they did admit that they were gathering info from users. They won’t admit to scraping my library, but they did admit to tracking a user’s activities. Adobe claims that it was covered by the their privacy policy and by the TOS for the app:

Adobe Digital Editions allows users to view and manage eBooks and other digital publications across their preferred reading devices—whether they purchase or borrow them. All information collected from the user is collected solely for purposes such as license validation and to facilitate the implementation of different licensing models by publishers. Additionally, this information is solely collected for the eBook currently being read by the user and not for any other eBook in the user’s library or read/available in any other reader. User privacy is very important to Adobe, and all data collection in Adobe Digital Editions is in line with the end user license agreement and the Adobe Privacy Policy.

Adobe Responds to ALA on Spying Scandal With Fictitious and Misleading Statements

http://the-digital-reader.com/2014/10/14/adobe-responds-ala-spying-scandal-fictitious-misleading-statements/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter#.VD2NtdSJjJd

The American Library Association reported yesterday that Adobe has responded to the ALA’s concerns about the recent revaluations of Adobe spying on users.

You can find the AlA’s press release here, but the short version is that Adobe is still claiming that sending a user’s reading logs in the clear met the standards of Adobe’s privacy policy. Adobe also continues to pretend that they weren’t also scanning user’s libraries and uploading that info as well.